Project Showcase: Hepburn Wind releases Community Green offset product

Australia’s flagship community energy project is 5 years old and they continue to innovate (and to pump out clean energy from wind).  “Community Green” is Hepburn Wind’s carbon offset program based on businesses, organisations and individuals purchasing Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) generated by the two wind turbines.  The best bit? – they extinguish the certificates, creating more demand for renewable energy in the energy market.

Find out more https://www.hepburnwind.com.au/community-green-offset/

As mentioned, Hepburn is 5 years old and they tell us they’ve created 50,000,000kWh of clean energy, harvested from the wind just outside Daylesford in Victoria.

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Project Showcase: Impact of CORENA’s revolving fund

CORENA has just completed its 13th project, 6kW solar for Kulchajam at Byron Bay, and are halfway through funding a large solar project for Tastex, a Tassie knitwear factory that employs people with a disability.  CORENA punching out new project almost isn’t news anymore, so we’re reporting on what their unique revolving fund means in practice.

We all understand intuitively that a revolving fund means money is used again later on in other projects and should make it easier to fund subsequent projects, but how much benefit is it actually? Obviously it will vary depending on project size and the amount of time between projects, but the chart below shows what has happened so far for CORENA projects. The chart represents a total of $127,325 of newly donated funds and a total of $42,536 in loan repayments to date.

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The table below shows is a screen-shot from CORENA’s newly released Impact Calculator and shows how much benefit has been achieved so far from a donation of $100 to either of the first two CORENA projects. Neither has finished repaying its interest-free loan yet, but the impact of the original $100 has roughly doubled already. How? Direct loan repayments from Project 1, for example, have helped fund many subsequent projects, but in addition, at least some ‘Project 1 money’ has also been in loan repayments from those subsequent projects.

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So far 83% of the money originally donated to Project 1 has been used a second time via direct loan repayments from Project 1. However, some of the money originally donated to Project 1 has now been used 3 or even more times. Project 1 money accounted for 14% of the loan repayments from Project 2, 4% of repayments from Project 3,  and 1.5%, 2%, 2%, and 0.3% respectively of repayments from Projects 4, 5, 7, and 11.

 

Of course, even after both projects have finished repaying their loans, and even after those projects reach the end of their lifespan, that $100 will continue to be used again and again, so the growth in impact is primarily just a function of time.

Project showcase: Tyalgum Energy Projects – bike launch

T10974560_1565416367008718_1172974369510152416_oyalgum is situated in far northern New South Wales and the Tyalgum Energy Project has ambitious plans for powering their town with renewable energy.  The clever people behind the project have a strong desire to bring the whole town on the journey with them and they plan to create universal support among the town’s 120 households.  To achieve this the group plans to have small but meaningful developments along the path to their ultimate goal.

This weekend, Tyalgum Energy Project will be launching their electric bike facility. After a sponsorship from Dyson Bikes, the project was able to purchase 5 electric bikes and has established a stand-alone charging station using solar and batteries.

The electric bike station will be located next to the heritage listed General Store, with the launch taking place between 11am and 2pm  and will be run alongside the monthly Tyalgum Village Markets. It will be a great opportunity to check out the village, the project and take a little ‘spin’ on the newest bikes on the block.

Andrew Price, Kacey Clifford, along with Patrick Bergeron and a select group of community members have been having regular monthly meetings and working together to research solutions for the community. The project now has Patrick as a full time engineer and has been positively progressing with solar systems about to be installed on roofs in the next couple of months.